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State: California
Subject Matter: THE FROG AND THE SCORPION OUR CONFERENCE AND WHY YOU SHOULD JOIN US
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 My job as an attorney really boils down to two things, (1) being an investigator in search of the truth, and (2) translating the truth into a better story than is woven in the attacks waged by our adversaries. Hence my recent preoccupation with frogs. If you’re a regular reader of my quarterly musings you know that in our last newsletter I left you with the parable about the frog and the scorpion.1 Today I find myself drawing on another frog story known as the sorites paradox, or the paradox of the heap. The sorites paradox considers the concept of "little-by-little arguments" whereby small incremental
differences in quantity are never individually large enough to create a change on the perceived whole. For example, take the measurement of a heap. Just exactly how many grains of sand does it take to make a heap? Or the converse, if I remove one grain of sand from the heap, is it still a heap? Thus we come once again to our frog. As the story goes, if you put a frog into a pot of boiling water the frog will immediately recognize the danger prompting it to leap out of the pot to safety. But, if instead you put the same frog into a pot of cold water and gradually raise the water temperature until it boils, the frog won’t recognize the gradual nature of the temperature change, staying complacently in the pot until it dies. The concept here is that when faced with a striking contradiction our senses are alerted to the change in circumstances and an appropriate reaction results. Faced with a continuum of smaller incremental changes introduced
gradually, however, can instead create a facade of consistency and safety that may lull us into inaction regardless of the escalating danger  (SEE ENTIRE DOCUMENT ATTACHED)


Document Author: Kippy Wroten
Firm/Company: Wroten & Associates
Document Date: March 2012
Search Tags: seminar webinar conference CA
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